Archives for August 2017

Markets Cautious but Resilient – Weekly Update for August 21, 2017

From domestic unrest to international terrorism, last week provided many headlines that could easily rattle the markets. While we did see days with volatility and declines, the major indexes remained relatively flat. For the week, the Dow was down 0.84%, the S&P 500 dropped 0.65%, and the NASDAQ fell 0.64%. On the international front, the MSCI EAFE remained virtually the same last week as the week before, recording a microscopic 0.0014% increase.

Why didn’t the markets react to the geopolitical turmoil by turning sharply negative? As we’ve shared before: Headlines shouldn’t drive long-term market behavior—economic fundamentals should. Last week, we received reports indicating the economy continues to be strong in a number of areas.

Here is a closer look at last week’s important economic news:

  • Robust Retail Sales: July retail sales rose 0.6%, beating expectations and showing strength in a variety of retail categories.
  • Strong Business Inventories: Factory, warehouse, and retail business inventories all jumped for a combined 0.5% increase in June. The data looks promising—inventory levels tend to rise in positive economic environments.
  • Uneven Industrial Activity: Industrial production rose 0.2% in July. This growth was lower than expected due to declining motor vehicle production dragging on the index.
  • Mixed Housing Data: The housing market index surged by 4 points as home-builders experience an increasing demand from buyers. But despite the growing appetite for new construction, July’s housing starts slipped, in part because builders are struggling to find experienced labor and new sites to build on.

Looking Ahead

This week, we will receive more data that helps deepen our perspectives on housing market health, Q3 expectations, and the Fed’s upcoming plans.

In this time of dramatic headlines and geopolitical uncertainty, we want to remind you that you are in control of your wealth and financial future. No matter what the talking heads want you to believe, stay focused on market fundamentals. Please call or email if you have any questions concerning specific market data or larger, developing issues.

ECONOMIC CALENDAR  

Wednesday: New Home Sales
Thursday: Jobless Claims, Existing Home Sales
Friday: Durable Goods Orders, Janet Yellen Speaks

SPECIAL UPDATE: Examining North Korea and the Markets

No one wants to see a clash between two nations with nuclear capabilities. So, when the war-of-words between North Korea and the U.S. reached a new level earlier this month, markets briefly stumbled as investors grew uneasy. While we don’t normally opine on geopolitical events, we wanted to help ease any financial worries you may have related to this recent conflict.

When sharing this analysis, we certainly do not have a crystal ball—and we recognize that any military escalation could affect far more than your investments. But, as we all look to see what’s on the horizon, we believe that historic perspective may help ease concerns about the tension’s impact on your financial future.

What can we learn from the past?

Data from Strategas Research Partners shows us that while the markets often have negative reactions to events when they first occur—they can recover within days or months.

For instance, on the day of Pearl Harbor, the S&P 500 declined 3.8%, but it was back within positive territory 20 days later. And just last year, the S&P 500 dropped 3.6% when the BREXIT vote came through — then was up by 19.5% a few months later.

History also shows us that war often does little to bring down the financial markets. In the month that two atomic bombs fell on Japan, the S&P 500 gained 5.8%.

Of course, no one wants to imagine the tension with North Korea escalating into war. Thankfully, Pyongyang announced on August 15 that they would not, in fact, strike near Guam. And with U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s assertion that there is no “imminent threat” of nuclear attack, the risk of war seems to be retreating.

What should you do now?

Looking forward, we must remember that the markets don’t always bounce back quickly after geopolitical events — but making fear-based choices can be very costly in the long run. No matter what happens, we are here to help you stay abreast of current market dynamics and focus on the economic fundamentals that drive lasting value.

We will continue to monitor the situation in North Korea, but headlines won’t distract us from pursuing our true goal: moving you toward the future you desire. If you want to discuss your specific strategy or investments in greater detail, please contact us any time.

And if you’d like to gain a wider understanding of how the markets have responded to geopolitical events in the past, explore the chart from CNBC and Strategas Research Partners included below at the end of this message.

Source: CNBC, Strategas Research Partners

We appreciate the thoughts of David Rosenberg, chief economist and strategist at Gluskin Sheff who said, “Geopolitics can create anxiety in financial markets, but aren’t going to bring the $18.5 trillion beast, otherwise known as the U.S. economy, to its knees.”

Markets Turn Jittery – Weekly Update for August 14, 2017

Last week, rising tension between North Korea and the U.S. rattled the world’s markets. As the two countries traded tough words, concerns escalated and markets reacted emotionally to the news. Though stress is building internationally, we remain committed to focusing on the market fundamentals that drive long-term value.

We recently published a special update outlining the details of how markets have reacted to other significant geopolitical events. History shows that markets can fall in the wake of alarming news but do recover, given time. We encourage you read through the post and talk to us if you have questions or concerns. You can find the special update HERE.

Amidst the pressure last week, volatility returned to markets—and all three major U.S. market indexes turned south. The Dow dropped 1.06%, the S&P 500 fell 1.43%, and the NASDAQ declined 1.50%. Global markets also reacted as the MSCI EAFE lost 1.59% for the week.

Though international developments dominated headlines, economic news important to markets and investors continued to roll out. The data reflects a solid economy, but some possible headwinds are on the horizon. Here are the highlights:

  • Impressive Corporate Earnings: Q2 corporate earnings reports both domestically and internationally were impressive. Reported corporate earnings in the U.S. increased an average of over 10% for the second quarter in a row—their first time doing so since 2011.
  • Low Inflation: The consumer price index, which measures changes to the average price of specific goods and services, rose only 0.1% in July. Expectations for a 0.2% increase failed to materialize as housing and travel costs, wireless services, and auto sales all slumped in July. At 1.7%, year-over-year inflation remains below the Federal Reserve’s targeted 2% growth rate. Continued low inflation may cause the Fed to rethink its plans to raise interest rates.
  • Rising Demand for Labor: Labor markets continue to be a key economic driver as evidenced by sharply rising job openings. June’s job openings jumped to 6.2 million from 5.7 million in May. Year-over-year, job openings climbed an impressive 11.3%. Moreover, jobless claims remain at historic lows.
  • High U.S. Household Debt: The current outstanding consumer debt of $12.7 trillion is now higher than the previous record reached in 2008. This debt load could wind up being a drag on consumer spending and the economy as a whole.

What Is Ahead

Tense geopolitical headlines may continue, but there will be plenty of market news, too. Retail, manufacturing, and housing data will come out this week, and Friday’s August consumer sentiment numbers will be of interest. Though the markets may move with emotions, economic fundamentals should continue to be the base for long-term value.

No matter what questions you may have, we always welcome you to reach out and contact us. We are here to help.

ECONOMIC CALENDAR

Tuesday: Retail Sales, Import and Export Prices, Housing Market Index, Business Inventories
Wednesday: Housing Starts
Thursday: Jobless Claims, Industrial Production
Friday: Consumer Sentiment

August 2017 Market Update Video


A slow first quarter followed by stronger growth in the spring has been a familiar pattern over the past several years. Because of it, the government began combined efforts to manage shortcomings in the government’s seasonal adjustment process. Even with this spring rally, though, economic analysts do not think it will meet the ambitious targets set by President Trump. For 2017, economic experts believe growth will come in around 2.2%, which is where growth has been since the Great Recession recovery began in mid-2009.

In this video, Josh will battle the mosquito apocalypse, and discuss some of the economic headlines that influenced markets in July, and give you some insight into what they could mean for you as an investor.

If you have any questions or concerns about your portfolio after watching this video, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us by email, or by giving us a call at (419) 425-2400. We would be happy to talk.

Markets Remain Bullish – Weekly Update for August 7, 2017

Another week of economic performance brought more news that the markets continue their bullish streak. After eight consecutive record-high closings, the Dow rose above 22,000 for the first time ever and finished the week up 1.20%. The S&P 500 was up 0.19% for the week, and the NASDAQ slightly fell by 0.36%. Meanwhile, the MSCI EAFE closed with a 0.82% increase.

The positive news continued with other upbeat reports. Manufacturing and employment each posted impressive numbers, suggesting a favorable Q3 start. And investors are looking ahead to possible Fed action on unwinding its balance sheet and bumping interest rates up again in December.

Here are key market developments that emerged last week:

Manufacturing Is On the Rise

Manufacturing is gaining speed as a key economic factor for Q3 and Q4. In June, new factory orders rose to almost a 10% annual increase, the best rate in the last 3 years. Unfilled orders also jumped 1.3% on rising demand for transportation equipment and capital goods. In addition, business confidence is at a 6-month high and inventories are up, though inflationary pressure remains soft. As a result, factory payrolls jumped 16,000 in July on top of June’s 12,000 increase.

Jobs Reports Remain Robust

Last Friday’s Employment Situation report marks the 5th time this year that payroll growth surpassed 200,000. While analysts predicted payrolls would grow by an additional 178,000, the actual number came in at 209,000. The solid employment increase helped lower the unemployment rate to 4.3%—the best rate since 2001.

Average hourly earnings also rose last week. The welcomed 0.34% increase on the month was the highest increase since October. Analysts hoped that low unemployment numbers would push yearly wage growth to over 3%, but year-to-date numbers continue to hover around growth of 2.5%.

Federal Reserve Weighs Options

Expect the Fed to raise interest rates in December by an additional ¼ point, though Fed Chair Janet Yellen has indicated that low inflation remains a concern for the economy. Despite robust financial markets, low unemployment, and a flourishing job market, inflation sits below the targeted 2% increase, with modest increases in both wage growth and consumer spending. Some analysts think that soft inflation could give pause to a year-end Fed rate hike.

Many observers believe the Federal Reserve will begin in September to shrink its $4.5 trillion balance sheet. The Fed balance sheet consists primarily of U.S. treasury bonds and mortgage-backed securities. To reduce this position, the Fed can either sell those securities, or it can opt not to reinvest securities as they mature.

What Is Ahead

Domestically

Widespread positive indicators are at the heart of a solid start to Q3. In addition to rebounding manufacturing activity and robust employment data, other aspects of the economy are brightening:

Internationally

In addition, economies around the world are moving in the right direction. The euro economies are showing continued strength, while emerging economies are expanding at their fastest rate since 2014.

As always, we encourage you to continue focusing on your long-term goals. Should you have any questions about the economy or your financial life, we are here for the conversation.

Economic Calendar

Tuesday: Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS)
Thursday: Jobless Claims
Friday: Consumer Price Index